Volume 6




read the lates issues from our media group

1

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Trona Pinnacles ( HBO WestWorld )

Activities:
  • BackpackBackpack
  • HikeHike
  • Amenities:
  • Picnic Area Picnic Area
  • RV Parking RV Parking
  • Author: Martin Lopez Portfolio Image

    Chances are that you have seen this place before! When a place as starkly ethereal as this is close to Hollywood, it's a safe bet that it'll show up in more than a few movies and TV commercials. It showed up in one of the early Star Trek movies (so far back that the original TV series stars were in it) and the first Planet of the Apes movie as well as HBO WestWorld . It's on a dirt road that is usually easily accessible by ordinary vehicles. It's a mile or so off the highway, and worth the effort. You can drive a typical small car to the pinnacles but I would not really drive a small car THRU the pinnacles as there are some hairy spots and sinking sand spots. 

     

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    2

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    Namib-Naukluft Park in Namibia Deadvlei

    Activities:
  • HikeHike
  • TourismTourism
  • Amenities:
  • Bike Parking Bike Parking
  • Author: Ahmad Portfolio Image

    Deadvlei is a white clay pan located near the more famous salt pan of Sossusvlei, inside the Namib-Naukluft Park in Namibia. Also written DeadVlei or Dead Vlei, its name means "dead marsh". Dead Vlei has been claimed to be surrounded by the highest sand dunes in the world, the highest reaching 300–400 meters (350m on average, named "Big Daddy" or "Crazy Dune"), which rest on a sandstone terrace. The clay pan was formed after rainfall, when the Tsauchab river flooded, creating temporary shallow pools where the abundance of water allowed camel thorn trees to grow. When the climate changed, drought hit the area, and sand dunes encroached on the pan, which blocked the river from the area. When you get to the parking area in Sossusvlei, walk to the south and climb the dune closest by. This will give you a great first view of the area. Alternatively, walk around it on the left and climb the huge Big Daddy dune (300+ meters) the get an even better view. After getting to the top, run down the flank of the dune to get to the Deadvlei. There are dozens of thousand-year-old trees that are so dry they don't even rot. The blue sky, orange/red dunes, with claypan and dark brown trees make it absolutely beautiful.

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    AWAYN INTERVIEW

    Interview with Peter Coskun

    Here’s the second part of our interview series celebrating our own home state, the beautiful state of Arizona... 

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    Peter, can you tell us a bit yourself?

    I grew up just outside the city of Philadelphia back east and never had much interest in nature back then, though I always tried to be creative with whatever I was doing especially in school. Just as I began high school, my family and I moved to Arizona, a drastic move for all of us. I used to ride BMX and always flipped through the magazines looking at the photos, which prompted me to get a camera of my own. Years of riding a bike in the desert allowed me to enjoy the surroundings a bit more than most. Slowly but surely, I was becoming addicted to being out in nature. When I finally got my DSLR I knew I was going to be photographing nature almost exclusively. A trip to Yellowstone was like a dream for me, all the wildlife and nature one could have. It wasn’t long after that I began to focus on landscape photography and again, slowly but surely, I was almost exclusively photographing the landscapes I was seeing. The long lens began collecting dust, and the wide angle began getting all the love.

     In 2012 after my first solo trip into California’s Eastern Sierra, I knew that I was going to primarily photograph landscapes from here on out. I still sometimes photograph wildlife when the situation presents itself, but it’s few and far between the amount of landscape photos I take.

     


    What did you find so unique about Arizona?

     

    Before I moved to Arizona, I always thought it was a true desert, barren, cacti everywhere, no rain or water, sand for miles, but I quickly realized that is not the case. In fact, I have found Arizona to be one of the most diverse places I’ve been, and most people are baffled by some of the locations that I photograph and share and mention they are somewhere in Arizona. If I’m not feeling the desert at the moment, I can drive an hour or two and be in the pine trees and mountains. If I want to photograph a lake or a river, there are plenty within driving distance. In the winter if I want to see snow I can drive up north and photograph it and come down to the desert and be in shorts the same day. It really is rather remarkable. We still get all four seasons here, in fact, IMO it’s hard to argue that there is anywhere better for fall color. Yes the east coast has some amazing places as do the rocky mountains, but neither of these locations can offer a lengthy autumn like here in Arizona. You can have various fall colors from late September all the way into January if you know where to look. The summer monsoons are also quite the spectacle and bring the drama of mother nature throughout the valley and all across the southwest.

     

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    Did you get to photograph any hidden places in Arizona?

    It’s harder and harder to find hidden places these days no matter where you are, more often than not someone else has been there. I wouldn’t necessarily say I get to photograph hidden places, but rather places that are seldom seen as it takes more work than the average tourist. I like finding new places to me or places I haven’t been before. I often have people ask me “where is this” on my photos. Most of these places can be found doing a bit of research, which is part of the fun of adventuring and exploring.


    What equipment do you use to captures your astrophotography?

     

    I don’t use any fancy trackers or telescopes for my “astrophotography”, just my trusty Canon 6d, a Tokina 16-28mm 2.8, a tripod, and a wireless remote trigger. My favorite places to photograph the night sky are typically up north on the Colorado Plateau which connects Northern Arizona and Southern Utah and has some of the most spectacular and remote landscapes in all the southwest. Although, I would be hard pressed to say that the Eastern Sierra area in California and Death Valley are right up there among my favorites for that type of photography.

     


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    For taking a crazy shot like that how do you combat sleep deprivation and the late nights?

    For most of my milky way images, I am up early in the morning (2-3am) hoping to photograph it arcing over the landscape. During the summer months, I just wait an hour or two after sunset and it’s usually quite visible. I think there was only one time where I did a nearly 48 hours no sleep marathon of shooting while in Yosemite and the Eastern sierra where I photographed the milky way both rising and setting in locations four hours away from another, sunrise to sunset, and then more milky way photography. I enjoy my sleep as much as I enjoy photography, so for me, it usually has to be worth it for me to get out of bed early in the morning. Most of the times I can predict what conditions will be like and if I need to wake up or not. If the skies are clouded over at 3 am then I just shut my eyes and go back to bed. Coffee and chocolate also help stay awake during the extra late nights.


    Closing Thoughts … How do you think photography and traveling have changed your view of the world?

    I think photographing the landscapes, the wilderness, the wildlife all over has given me much more appreciation for all things nature. I don’t take anything I get to experience out in the field for granted. I feel more free when I am traveling and exploring, not only taking photographs but actually being in these places. I want my photographs to bring some sense of awareness that wild places still and very much should exist in nature. I want people to appreciate these wild places rather than destroy them, and if my images can help do that then they have served more of a purpose and give me, even more, a reason to keep traveling and photographing.




    ADVENTURES highlights

    3

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    Lost Dog Overlook Ring Trail

    Activities:
  • HikeHike
  • Amenities:
  • Parking Parking
  • Author: Arizona Portfolio Image

    This two-trail hike makes a 2.4 mile loop, and has many gradual ups and downs with little overall elevation change. Lost Dog Overlook has excellent views south and is an ancient tool-making site—some of the rock flakes are from prehistoric tool-making work! You can also enjoy great wildflowers in the spring. A gentle hike with a few moderate sections and several wash crossings makes this an interesting and enjoyable experience for most hikers. Kids with hiking experience would find this a relatively easy hike. Follow the Lost Dog Wash trail northward to the junction with the Ringtail trail. Turn right onto the Ringtail trail and follow it around a loop that ends at the Anasazi spur, where you should turn right. Go north to the Sunrise trail junction, turn left and then shortly left again onto the Lost Dog Wash trail back to the parking area.

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    4

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    False Kiva utah

    Activities:
  • BackpackBackpack
  • HikeHike
  • Amenities:
  • Picnic Area Picnic Area
  • Parking Parking
  • Author: Jasperguy Portfolio Image

    False Kiva is a human-made stone circle of unknown origin in a cave in a remote area of the Canyonlands National Park, which is located in U.S. state of Utah. It requires some hiking knowledge or special directions to find. make sure you are get a permit thru the canyonlands website its $30 for 14 days .Trail head is unmarked, starts near a guard rail, just south from the Alcove Springs parking lot. From here you just hunt for the next cairn as you walk down into the wash. This leads you down into the side of the canyon with a moderate elevation decent for the length of the trail. Some people had difficulty route finding once they got to the lower section of the canyon trail. Just remember, look for cairns, there will be a set near the bottom of the canyon section that are prompting you to climb up a small step up, and hug the canyon wall until it reaches the actual false kiva.

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    5

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    Double Arch star watching

    Activities:
  • HikeHike
  • PhotographyPhotography
  • Amenities:
  • Child Friendly Child Friendly
  • Parking Parking
  • Author: Logan Fox

    Double Arch is an incredibly intricate formation of arches at the Windows Section of Arches National Park. The Windows area has the largest concentration of natural arches in the entire world. There are so many attractions packed into such a small area such as this. The Parade of Elephants, Turret Arch, The Windows (AKA The Spectacles), Cove Arch, Ribbon Arch, Elephant Butte, and the Cove of Caves are all within a short distance of each other. Double Arch takes its name because it consists of two arches that share the same stone as a foundation for both of their outer legs. The Double Arch Trailhead is located at the north end of the circle at the far north of the parking lot for the Windows area. There are always parking space available here so after visiting the Windows Arches, you should drive the car here instead of hiking in the hot weather. The trail to Double Arch is easy and short (0.5 mile or 0.8 km round trip) with nice surrounding views. You are allowed to climb and explore everywhere beneath, through and surrounding of the arches (not on top of them though). Climbing at Arches is one of the most enjoyable and exciting activities.

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