Volume 7




read the lates issues from our media group

1

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Hike and Relax Capo Caccia Vertical Cliffs

Activities:
  • BoatingBoating
  • ChillingChilling
  • HikeHike
  • Amenities:
  • Child Friendly Child Friendly
  • Food Nearby Food Nearby
  • Hotel Nearby Hotel Nearby
  • Lodge Nearby Lodge Nearby
  • Picnic Area Picnic Area
  • Author: Elle Portfolio Image

    This is one of the most stunning places on the island. It is 25 KM from Alghero– 90 minutes on scenic route by bike or 30 minutes by bus (off the season) just morning bus at 9:15 from via Catalogna bus station back at 12:00 which gives you plenty time to discover the palace and walk down to Grotta di Nettuno for 11:00 AM tour. Great views to all sides, rough rocks, gorgeous sea.It takes 30 minutes to the cliffs and then you can pay extra to go into Neptunes Cave and then come back on the same boat. They take you all around the bottom of the cliffs and show you the erosion that has taken place.

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    2

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    Consuegra The windmills of Don Quixote Hiking Trip

    Activities:
  • HikeHike
  • TourismTourism
  • Amenities:
  • Child Friendly Child Friendly
  • Lodge Nearby Lodge Nearby
  • Author: Dave Abramovich Portfolio Image

    There is something absolutely magical about coming through a little Manchega town and suddenly finding yourself looking out over a ridge in the outskirts, a ridge lined with windmills of an era, long ago. If you love Don Quixote and the Man of La Mancha, this is a place you should go see, but be prepared for a hard time finding it. As you approach Consuegra from the direction of Madrid or Toledo, you can see the windmills but there is very little signage telling you how to get up to the top of the hill to visit them. Once you find the road up, go ahead all the way to the top where there is plenty of parking. Once there, there is not much more to see or do. When we were there we saw that one of the windmills seemed to have a little shop of something in it and another was open to go into, but just seeing them was all I was there for.

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    AWAYN INTERVIEW

    Interview with Mead Norton

    If you havent heard of Mead Nortton's work now it's time to get to know him! Unlike some sports photographers, Mead covers a wide range of sports. To give aspiring photographers an idea what it’s like to be a working adventure photographer, we interviewed Mead about his work, including what it’s like for him to shoot an event, some shooting tips for aspiring action photographers, and some travel horror stories.  

     

     

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    Mead what first drew you to action photography?

    I  grew up loving sports- I played football competitively and made it to semi-pro level and realised that my athletic abilities would not take me any further but I didn’t want to give up living and interacting with athletes and sports so I turned to documenting sports and athletes with my camera.

     

    How does a photographer get their foot in the door in the action sports photography industry?

    As glamorous as it sounds, working as a professional photographer in the action sports industry is quite difficult. 90% of my time is spent in my office on my computer either editing images from my last shoot or emailing potential clients trying to land my next job. To be successful, you need to get your work seen by the decision makers and also you need to have access to good athletes to document.


    As a professional photographer when you’re presented with a less than ideal situation, how do you find your subjects and produce images you would be happy with?

    My main job as a photographer is not to capture an image with my camera, but to problem solve and when I am presented with less than ideal conditions then I think outside the box to come up a solution to capture an image that both I as an artist and my clients will be happy with. A key factor with that is understanding your camera and lighting equipment so that you don’t waste a lot of time experimenting with settings. Also by planning ahead knowing what kind of looks you are after for each shoot and knowing when the light will be the best for the location you will be shooting at then that also saves a lot of time. In saying that when shooting some sports like Surfing or Skiing, then you are also a bit at the mercy of Mother Nature and having a lot of patience is also a key factor in being a good photographer.

      

     

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    What equipment do you use to captures your footage? What are some of the challenges of using them?

    I shoot with a wide range of cameras and have over 45 cameras that I have used in my career including a handbuilt 4x5 camera, pinhole 4x5 cameras (where the negatives are 4 inches by 5 inches), plastic holga medium format cameras, and digital cameras. My main cameras are Canon 5D mkIV which is great for me because it is more portable than the 1D series of cameras and the only reason I am a Canon shooter and not a Nikon shooter is that I started shooting on Canon cameras and have too many lenses to make the switch (If I had started out shooting Nikons, I would be a Nikon shooter). There is not real quality difference between the two brands. I also am using a Fuji XT2 mirrorless camera for when I want something smaller and more compact than my big DSLR Canon and have used that to photograph a 100km ultra run that I ran and documented from a runner’s point of view. I also have a collection of Go Pro cameras that I use as well.

     


    What is the most memorable trip you have had in recent memory? What kind of hidden places did you get to explore?

    Probably my biggest trip was my first trip to Nepal and Tibet. I spent six months in Nepal working as an English Teacher in a rural village on the trekking trail to Mt. Everest documenting the life of the students and teachers in the school and while I was there I got to climb a 6,000M mountain and attend a Buddhist festival in a remote village that no other Western visitor has attended and then I spent another month after that in Tibet where I hitchhiked to Nam-Tso Lake, the 3rd most visited holy site for Tibetan Buddhists and spent a week photographing the lake and pilgrims and also attended the Drigun-Til Buddhist Festival where I was one of three westerners in a sea of 15,000 Tibetans. 

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    Any nightmare travel stories?

    Nightmare travel stories- I guess it depends on what you consider nightmarish. I had dengue fever when I was in Thailand and spent a week in a hospital there and was almost not allowed to leave until I paid my bill in cash because the hospital would not accept my travel insurance. Only problem was that my wallet and passport were still in the hut I was staying in on a remote island 3 hours away. I finally convinced them to let me go back to the island and pay my bill to the doctor there. 

     

    Lost bags, delayed flights, double booked hotels are fairly standard stuff for me when travelling and which is why I always travel with all my camera gear on me and will miss a flight before I gate check any of my gear.

     

     


    What advice would you give to someone embarking on their first adventure?

    The two pieces of advice I have for anyone looking on heading out on an adventure is 

     

    1: Know/learn how to use your camera and what all the settings are on it. As good as the auto settings are getting on cameras, they can’t know if you are trying to freeze the action of a mountain biker or taking a nice calm landscape. As one of my photography teachers said, your brain is a much bigger and better computer than the little microchips put inside a camera.

     

    2: Do your research before you go, know what the local customs are, what the rules are about where you can and can’t shoot and be sure to follow those rules and be flexible with your trip. A lot of times if I am just going on an exploratory trip somewhere I book the 1st night in a hotel and then I spend the first day in my new location to explore the area and figure out where I want to be based and I also always talk to the locals to find out their favourite places to visits, go to.

     

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    ADVENTURES highlights

    3

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    Little Blue Lake

    Activities:
  • HikeHike
  • RelaxingRelaxing
  • Scuba DivingScuba Diving
  • SwimmingSwimming
  • Amenities:
  • Child Friendly Child Friendly
  • Dog friendly Dog friendly
  • Picnic Area Picnic Area
  • Parking Parking
  • Author: None Portfolio Image

    The Little Blue Lake of Mount Gambier is a popular tourist attraction in the region of Mount Gambier. Only 11 km southwest of Mount Gambier is the Little Blue Lake, those driving here should look for the turnoff near the Bellum Hotel. The Little Blue Lake is a small lake where bluish water used to be crystal clear. However, the lake water has turned into a dark green due to excessive pollution in recent times. This lake's greenish color was due to its water's excessive algae growth. The lake has now become clean and clear following current cleaning projects. 

    The Little Blue Lake is this area's popular diving and swimming spot, with lots of people coming here to enjoy the beautiful scenery. The local council has built a stepped walkway because of its high popularity, which leads to a floating pontoon on the lake. Swimmers will find it easy to get to the lake and swim in the water with such options. 

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    4

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    Monteverde Costa Rica

    Activities:
  • BackpackBackpack
  • HikeHike
  • Amenities:
  • Parking Parking
  • Author: None Portfolio Image

    Monteverdi is one of the most famous places in Costa Rica; its fame stems from the cloud forest filled with all kinds of plant and animal life forms. It has some of the longest and most exciting suspension bridges and zip lines in all of Costa Rica. 

    One of the best activities to partake in is skywalking on the suspension bridges. For those that love tree climbing, you can recapture the feeling and get the opportunity to go to very higher altitudes than you have ever done when you take a skywalk through the rainforest of Monteverdi. The skywalk is a great way to explore the cloud forest. 

    Cutting across canyons and drainages these bridges provide the visitors the opportunity to come face to face with the forest canopy of Montenegro. There are about 6 of these bridges in all; these bridges have considerable length with some being as long as 500 ft. and as tall as 200ft, however, the longest is about 984 feet. 

    With a trail extending for over a mile and a half (2.5km), the tour can easily be carried out by anyone who is in moderate shape. The climbs are made in such a way that it is not too strenuous and the trails are generally flat and well maintained. 

    The tours are set to last for approximately two to three hours starting from 7:30 AM, 9:30 AM and 11:30 AM. And each group consists only a maximum of ten persons.

    Feel nature in its raw form with the bio divers’ forest that this environment provides as the suspension bridges give you access to a new level of experience which you have never seen before. The upper level of the forest canopy provides an ecosystem that houses some 90%of all cloud forest organisms hence you can breathe in the freshest of air and observe wide life in this environment usually kept back for a biologist. 

    Because of the of the thick vegetative cover, sunlight is very strong at the top with little or no sunlight getting to the bottom of the forest hence forcing various trees such as climbers and animals to gear towards the forest canopy in their hunt for sunlight and food respectively. Another advantage of these suspension bridges is that it does not only allow one to peer into the top of the forest, but also allow one access to vegetated canyons below.

    Biologist and zoologist would find Montverde interesting because it also possesses its unique flora. These plants mostly are adapted specially to be able to obtain moisture from Epiphytes (plants that live on trees in order to reach the sunlight) which are numerous in the forest, however even though these plants live on trees, they are not parasitic but rather feed on tiny nutrient and dust that accumulate around their roots. 

    Finally, Costa Rica is home to over 1,400 species of orchids, almost all of them epiphytes with other epiphytes including bromeliads and makes up one of the most complex ecosystems in the world. For those that are biologists, zoologist or just nature lovers, this place is a place you won’t want to miss as you are sure to be intrigued by the awesome view this place provides and the best way to see this unique complex life up close is by taking a skywalk. 

     

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