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By: Awayn Media

INTRODUCTIONS

Tal Roberts got his start creating still images by hitting the pause button when the tricks looked just right on the classic skateboard videos of the mid 1990’s. Though he didn’t use a real camera until years later the desire to document his passions was still intact. Originally from Gig Harbor, Washington, Tal lives in Portland, Oregon and continues to focus on making pictures of his friends having fun. 

 

What first drew you to action photography?

As a kid I was spending all of my time skateboarding so it was inevitable that when I got interested in photography that I would try to capture the action around me. 

All your photographs are amazing. As a professional photographer how do you find your subjects?

It’s good to shoot, at least some of the time, in a scene you’re involved in because you’ll know the athletes and what they excel at, and that will help you form ideas for shots. For action shoots sometimes it’s the same as it was when I was getting started, going out to shoot with friends I skate or snowboard with. Now a lot more of the shoots I do are pre planned and the brand that I am shooting for will line up athletes that they want images of.

What makes the good picture stand out from the average?

It would be impossible to pinpoint one thing that separates the good from the average. Factors like great light and composition can get it there but what seems to make an image really stand out is when the photographer has done something different from what you may have expected or are used to seeing. I also like to see images that hade some thought put into them beforehand.

What is the most memorable trip you have had in recent memory?

A couple years ago I had a chance to go to a snowboard event in Riksgransen, Sweden called King of the Hill. I was there spring and Riksgransen is up toward the Arctic Circle so there were 24 hours of daylight each day, which was something new to me. I went with Smith Optics and a rad group of snowboarders. Each day was a loose schedule of riding around the ski area and shooting whatever we found interesting. After a super fun week of riding we drove over to Lofoten, Norway for a few days where we stayed on a cool little bay, skated some roadside mini ramps, and checked out some of the coolest landscape I’ve ever seen. And then skated around Oslo for a day on the way home.

What equipment do you use to captures your images? What are some of the challenges of using them?

I use Nikon cameras and lenses for most of my digital work. I also shoot an assortment of film cameras pretty regularly. Those include a Leica M6, Hasselblad 503cx, and my favorite the Hasselblad Xpan.

Closing Thoughts … How do you think photography and traveling has changed your view of the world?

I think photography has been a really good motivation for me to get out and see more of the world. Traveling has helped me learn a ton about the world that I had no clue about before I started this journey. My interest in photography probably comes from a curiosity about the world, and working with cameras is a great reason to go take a closer look at your surroundings.

Tal Roberts. All Action Photography

Awayn


Tal Roberts got his start creating still images by hitting the pause button when the tricks looked just right on the classic skateboard videos of the mid 1990’s. Though he didn’t use a real camera until years later the desire to document his passions was still intact. Originally from Gig Harbor, Washington, Tal lives in Portland, Oregon and continues to focus on making pictures of his friends having fun. 

 

What first drew you to action photography?

As a kid I was spending all of my time skateboarding so it was inevitable that when I got interested in photography that I would try to capture the action around me. 


All your photographs are amazing. As a professional photographer how do you find your subjects?

It would be impossible to pinpoint one thing that separates the good from the average. Factors like great light and composition can get it there but what seems to make an image really stand out is when the photographer has done something different from what you may have expected or are used to seeing. I also like to see images that hade some thought put into them beforehand.


What makes the good picture stand out from the average?

It would be impossible to pinpoint one thing that separates the good from the average. Factors like great light and composition can get it there but what seems to make an image really stand out is when the photographer has done something different from what you may have expected or are used to seeing. I also like to see images that hade some thought put into them beforehand.

What is the most memorable trip you have had in recent memory?

A couple years ago I had a chance to go to a snowboard event in Riksgransen, Sweden called King of the Hill. I was there spring and Riksgransen is up toward the Arctic Circle so there were 24 hours of daylight each day, which was something new to me. I went with Smith Optics and a rad group of snowboarders. Each day was a loose schedule of riding around the ski area and shooting whatever we found interesting. After a super fun week of riding we drove over to Lofoten, Norway for a few days where we stayed on a cool little bay, skated some roadside mini ramps, and checked out some of the coolest landscape I’ve ever seen. And then skated around Oslo for a day on the way home.

What equipment do you use to captures your images? What are some of the challenges of using them?

I use Nikon cameras and lenses for most of my digital work. I also shoot an assortment of film cameras pretty regularly. Those include a Leica M6, Hasselblad 503cx, and my favorite the Hasselblad Xpan.

Closing Thoughts … How do you think photography and traveling has changed your view of the world?

I think photography has been a really good motivation for me to get out and see more of the world. Traveling has helped me learn a ton about the world that I had no clue about before I started this journey. My interest in photography probably comes from a curiosity about the world, and working with cameras is a great reason to go take a closer look at your surroundings.