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Walk the Bridle Path Lyttelton

Lyttelton is a small port town in the Banks Peninsula and just over the Port Hills from Christchurch. It was first settled in the 1850s by Christchurch’s first European settlers. 

When the settlers first arrived, they walked over a path called the Bridle Path, which led them to Christchurch. This track can be accessed from the base of Lyttelton and is a steep 30-minute hike to the summit. 

The walk up requires reasonable levels of fitness and will take you past old war bunkers from WWII. At the summit there are spectacular 360-degree views of Lyttelton Harbour, the Southern Alps, Christchurch and the Banks Peninsula. 

Once at the top there are several options on how to get back down. There is the option to continue along the summit of Bridle Path and go towards the gondola, which offers a café and viewing platform. Tickets can also be purchased to ride the gondola back down towards the Christchurch side. The Bridle Path also continues downhill towards Christchurch as well, in which there are many sheep grazing on this side of the hill. Plotted along this side of the track are information panels that talk about the history of the first settlers and the significance of the Bridle Path. 

Hikers can also go back down the Bridle Path towards Lyttelton, in which there are plenty of vibrant cafes, quirky shops and restaurants to enjoy in the colourful town of Lyttelton. 

 


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