Volume 8




read the lates issues from our media group

1

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The Kaluts Desert

Activities:
  • BackpackBackpack
  • HikeHike
  • Amenities:
  • Picnic Area Picnic Area
  • Author: None Portfolio Image

    The Kaluts (meaning sandy mountains in Persian/Farsi) is a desert which is part of a bigger desert named Lut (or Dash-e Lut). 

     

    This incredible location is also known as the hottest place on earth ( a NASA satellite captured the highest temperature ever registered on the Earth’s surface, which was 71ºC, no kidding.) which means: you wouldn't  have to worry about any  desert threats since no single plant or creature can survive in such a harsh environment!

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    2

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    The Puente Viejo (Old Bridge) in Ronda

    Activities:
  • HikeHike
  • Amenities:
  • Food Nearby Food Nearby
  • Picnic Area Picnic Area
  • Author: None Portfolio Image

    Puente Viejo is the oldest and smallest of three bridges that span the 120-metre deep chasm that carries the Guadalevín River and divides the city of Ronda in southern Spain. It was built in 1616, and currently only carries pedestrian traffic. You can continue your journey from the Puente Viejo towards Puente Nueve.

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    AWAYN INTERVIEW

    Geoff Coombs an unseen Underworld

    Don't worry you won't be the first person who is asking: what is this? Is this real? What is happening? How did they shoot this!? That’s how you fall in love with Geoff Coombs’s photography. 

    Toronto, Ontario based freediver and photographer’s enchanting collection of underwater photography captures the underworld we don't get to experience a lot. Awayn had a pleasure of chatting Geoff to talk underwater photography. 

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    What first drew you to underwater photography?

    I’ve always loved sports and action sports, specifically anything around the water. At the same time, I always loved to express myself artistically but found painting and drawing to be too slow. I wanted to be active and use my physical abilities to interact in nature while creating art. I found photography when I was on a family trip to the Bahamas in 2015. There, I was introduced to freediving and took photos with my old GoPro. After that trip I was hooked. 


    how do you decide to take the shots? Give us an insight into your world as an adventure photographer

    I find my subjects just through my core group of friends. The majority of my underwater work is of my best friend Andrew Ryzebol. Together we’ve grown to be very close friends and we trust each other with our lives when we are pushing the limits under ice or performing deep dives. When I am travelling or just in my local ‘backyard’ of Georgian Bay, I sometimes will plan shots ahead of time. I imagine an image in my mind and then try to recreate it with my subjects. It is a team effort with my underwater work, where I will tell the subject what to do, and then I will get into position and capture it. A lot of other times though it’s just spontaneous. 

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    What I really like about your underwater work is that it takes the audience to a completely another universe. I am sure making beautiful composition is hard! So what are some of the challenges of photographing your subjects?

    The biggest challenge of my underwater work is just getting in the right position at the right time. All of my underwater work has been shot while I am freediving. So going down to 10 meters on one breath with a big camera in my hand, while equalizing, and at the same time positioning myself to capture my buddy in a great position, and doing all of this while trying to stay relaxed is difficult. My under ice work adds an extra element of difficulty just because it is so cold. But your body and mind adapt to those conditions over time. I find it very rewarding, especially when we pull off a great shot.


    What is the most memorable trip you have had in recent memory? What kind of hidden places did you get to explore?

    All of my trips have been memorable, it’s difficult to choose just one. But the one that sticks out to me is the trip I did to Kauai back in summer of 2016. We were camping 4000 feet above sea level on an epic spire one night overlooking the Kalalau Valley. The sunset was incredible. I remember waking up at 3am and stepping outside and seeing all the stars. It was beautiful. That was a special moment. 

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    What equipment do you use?

    The majority of my work has been shot on a Canon 6D in an underwater housing. Recently though I bought the Canon 5D Mark IV as my new primary setup. It’s a beast. I also use various lenses from a 15mm fisheye, 24mm 2.8 prime, 16-35mm f/4 lens, and a 70-200mm f/2.8. All Canon gear. I’ve put this stuff through really harsh conditions, and it’s always reliable and brings out high quality images. I also have basic freediving gear including a 7mm Riffe wetsuit, mask, Moana carbon fins, and other little things. All of the gear is easy to use and works well. The biggest challenge is just travelling with all my gear, but I try to keep it simple so it’s not too bad. 

     


    Do you have any tips or habits from the road you can share?

    I find it useful to have a routine, and little comforts that you can bring with you when you’re travelling or in uncomfortable places. Having proper gear and clothing is essential when I travel. I always make sure I have food with me that doesn’t get easily crushed – such as nuts, hard fruits, peanut butter, bread, and especially in cold months, a thermos of hot tea. It’s the little things that bring some comfort when you’re out in extreme conditions. 

    Follow Geoff 

    Instagram @geoff_coombs 

    www.geoffcoombs.com 

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    ADVENTURES highlights

    3

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    Haiku Stairs , Kaneohe

    Activities:
  • HikeHike
  • PhotographyPhotography
  • Amenities:
  • Parking Parking
  • Author: Chantel Marie Portfolio Image

    Haiku Stairs - Access Restricted is temporarily closed. Scheduled to reopen on February 28, 2018. One of the most amazing things I have ever seen but have to mention this is not an easy hike and will leave you very exhausted the next day. Though the route is closed but there is another route which is longer, legal and you still get to reach the viewpoint of the Haiku Stairs. You don’t actually use the stairs to reach the viewpoint but you can still walk down the stairs for some photos before returning down the legal route.This would be my advice to those wanting the experience of the Haiku Stairs but also want to avoid any chance of a big fine (1K dollars fine) or running into the police.   You have to go early and find street parking at someone's house. The residents aren't a fan so taking a taxi is a great idea. Get there before sunrise.  Bring snacks and plenty of water. If you park near in the residential area be careful because they might have you towed!!!!

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    4

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    Hike to Lake of Carezza, Carezza, Nova Levante, Italy

    Activities:
  • HikeHike
  • RelaxingRelaxing
  • Amenities:
  • Bike Parking Bike Parking
  • Author: Elle Portfolio Image

    This lake is one of top three most popular lakes in Dolomite and has a unique rainbow color and small shape which a reflection of Dolomite mountain range. The circle walk around the lake will allow you to take a photo in may angle. Don't miss this. And the walk is not far. The entrance to the lake will walk under tunnel from the restaurants and parking lot just opposite.

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    5

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    Koko Crater Trail

    Activities:
  • HikeHike
  • Amenities:
  • Parking Parking
  • Author: None Portfolio Image

    Koko Crater Trail, better acknowledged as “Koko Head Stairs”, is your StairMaster workout for the day, with a lucrative panoramic view up top. This Oahu hike will check your endurance and strength to continually take each extra step up the mountain as you stride over one thousand steps to reach the top! As challenging as it sounds, hiking the Koko Head path is a fun and very famous hike on Oahu.

    Hiking Koko Crater Trail

    Stairs stairs and yes, greater stairs! I’m referring to old railroad ties that are set up to the hillside from the bottom to the top.

    The army created lookout pillbox bunkers in the course of World War II. A railway was created on the Koko Crater trail, and used to haul cargo and materials up to the top. two Today the abandoned railway is used as hiking stairs to attain the ancient navy bunkers and ridgeline.

    This Oahu hike is effortless to find, effortless to park, convenient to navigate, and now not so handy to climb! After parking in the Koko Head District Park parking lot, you will locate an easily identifiable trail that leads to the start of the climb up the mountainside.

    Simply start strolling towards the stop of the parking lot and follow the path main past the baseball field.

    The filth path is a quick one hundred yard from the park path, before attaining the first step leading in the direction of the top.

    The path starts off evolved off incredibly convenient for the first one hundred steps and progressively receives tougher from there.

    It doesn’t take lengthy before you have some outstanding drop lower back views. two I commonly take a breather after every 100 steps and revel in the view. two As you climb higher up the Koko Head Stairs, no longer solely does the horizon view continue to extend, but new landmarks come into sight, such as Hanauma Bay.

    Being able to view each Hanauma Bay and the Port Lock Peninsula is quite spectacular!

    There are a complete of 1050 steps from the bottom to the pinnacle of the ridge. And in all fairness it feels more like 2100 steps! two A majority of the stairs on the Koko Crater Trail are long and taller than a widespread 7 inch stairway step.

    You will attain a small area that is flat, but nonetheless comes with a challenge, as it acts as a bridge with a 40 ft drop below. It's not difficult to cross, but might not experience cozy if you have a fear of heights. two Watch your footing and take your time crossing this section.

     

    You will want a little bit of persistence after the midway mark, as you’ll discover your self taking extra breaks along the way. two Make positive to step apart and enable other hikers to safely pass by way of you.

    Reach stair variety 900 and you’re in the remaining stretch. And even though there is light at the quit of the tunnel, you will feel every step you take forward! I handy take half a dozen breaks from here to the top. I additionally be mindful staring at the final 20 steps, as I relaxation on the aspect trying to trap my breath and let the blood return to my legs!

    But in all fairness, I saw all sorts of hikers on this Koko Crater Trail, inclusive of of us who have been each in and out of shape, children trekking up, and even a few who had been on foot up in flip flops! I incredibly recommend carrying the desirable hiking shoes if you determine to select this Oahu trekking trail.

    The Koko Crater Trail will take you 30 minutes to 1 hr to reach the top. two Give yourself every other hour to relax up pinnacle before starting your decent.

    The Koko Crater Trail Ridge

    There is no higher feeling than conquering those Koko Head Stairs and reaching the top! Climb above the old military bunker, and there are some exceptional panoramic views from Diamond Head to Makapu’u Pt…the payoff is worth it!

    You will also discover a stunning bottom to the ridge, with views of the lava rock shoreline and sizeable Sandy Beach.

    There is a small ridgeline path that extends outward and again down the different facet of the mountain. two This path is narrow, steep and dangerous!

    I would no longer suggest exploring it! But there are some giant flat rocky shelves that you sit, relaxation your legs and take it all in.

    There are lots of neat areas to explore on top of the Koko Crater Trail. You will truly prefer to provide yourself some greater time to rest, explore, and take it all in. You owe it to yourself...you just climbed 1050 steps!

    If the shelves appear a little too steep to loosen up on, then think about climbing on top of the steel grade lookout to soak in the view. two Just make sure to watch your footing as you pass round up there.

    Climbing lower back down the Koko Crater Trail

     

    Yes, climbing again down the stairs is easier than the climb up. two But take into account that your legs muscle mass will be a bit worn out which will make the trip again down a little greater dangerous.

     

    Take your time and do not speed up your descent. two It’s also just as exceptional to take breaks alongside the way, as you did on your way up…not to mention the view the complete way down!

     

    Hiking Tips

    No Shade - this hike is positioned on the hot dry south facet of the island with no shade. two Start as early as feasible as it will only get hotter as the solar rises. two You have to get up excellent early to catch a sun rise, however it can be worth it. two Make sure to convey a flashlight in that case!

     

    Come Prepared - bring water, sunscreen, true hiking shoes, hat & sunglasses. two You also may want to deliver a SLR camera if your cellphone photos aren’t good enough.

    Time - Give yourself 1 ½ to 3 hrs for this hike depending how plenty time you desire to spend up top

    From Waikiki take the Kalaianaoli Hwy (H-1) south.

    Remain on this coastal Hwy as it turns into Hwy 72.

    Once you attain the Hawaii Kai Shopping Center, flip left on Lunalilo Home Rd

    Turn right onto Anapalau St.

    Turn Left into Koko Head District Par

    Park and proceed up at the back of the baseball field, closer to Koko Head.

     

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